Hackers Breach Alabama and Texas Law Enforcement Sites

As part of their operations against law enforcement agencies, Anonymous hackers breached the sites of the Alabama Department of Public Safety, the Texas Department of Public Safety, and the Mobile Police Department, also based in Alabama, leaking information from their databases.

DataBreaches sums up the hacks nicely, revealing that the hackers managed to obtain tons of sensitive information, but published only enough to prove that the sites are vulnerable, making sure that no innocent individual suffers.


The main actors of these hacks are CabinCr3w and w0rmer, but it seems they were assisted by Kahuna in the breach that targeted the Alabama Mobile Police Department (mobilepd.org).

“We at the Cabin have been monitoring your recent racist legislation in an attempt to punish immigrants as criminals,” the hackers said after breaching Mobile PD.

“The authorities in the state of Alabama are now able to question people suspected of being in the country illegally and hold them, and officials are able to check the immigration status of students in public schools. We will not idly stand by as this happens.”

The database contained information on offenders such as ID, case number, names, physical descriptions, and other data, but the hackers redacted all the sensitive information.

The most worrying fact is that the attackers claim that the Mobile Police Department stores sensitive information such as Social Security Numbers without any encryption in place, making the data accessible to cybercriminals and fraudsters.

From the Public Safety Departments of Texas and Alabama there was not much data leaked, except for a few database structures, the hackers urging the site’s administrators to patch them up.

“Totally more but I didn’t wanna pull it all , it’s just the Department of Public Safety!” the hackers wrote. “Come on IT Guys , at least try.”

DataBreaches notified Mobile PD of the incident, but it’s uncertain for the time being if the necessary measures were taken to ensure their users’ safety.


news.softpedia.com

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