Anonymous to UP: Apologize to Your Students or We Leak Data


It seems that the bomb threats recently investigated by the FBI weren’t causing enough trouble to the University of Pittsburg. Now, Anonymous is threatening the institution’s CS and law departments with leaking tons of information if they don’t release a public apology to the students, professors and law enforcement agents for lying to them.

“We now have obtained access to every students password, username, email address', personal addresses, dorm room information, parental information, course information, payment information to include type of payment, amount paid and all corresponding Credit Card information,” the hackers said.

“We also possess the equivalent data of the instructors, have access to all coursework, grades, and every student alumni's information. We also have access to the ‘Hydrogen’ server and have helped ourselves to save over 200 gigabytes of information.”


According to the hacktivists, the University not only failed to protect student information stored on its systems, but also aided authorities to apprehend a number of individuals that were considered to be Anonymous supporters.

As a result, the hackers want University of Pittsburg representatives to post an apology on the institution’s public website and keep it there for “no less than 15 days.”

“If these are not met, we will have no choice, but to release the information as we see fit! The clock is ticking!” Anonymous concluded.

The deadline is May 6, but in the meantime, the hackers claim to have deleted all the information they've stolen from the servers, because the university failed to keep it safe.

As mentioned earlier, this is not the only problem the university is confronted with at the moment. In the past weeks, we have reported that the FBI kept seizing servers that were used to store the Mixmaster anonymous remailer.

First they confiscated a server from Riseup, one that contained a number of other sites belonging to individuals and organizations that had nothing to do with the incident, and later they paid a visit to the administrator of an Austrian remailer.



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